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ChesterRep is the University of Chester's institutional repository and an online platform designed to collate, store, and aid discoverability of research carried out at the university to the wider research community

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  • Cultural Antecedents of Sustainability and Regional Economic Development - A Study of SME ‘Mittelstand’ Firms in Baden-Württemberg (Germany)

    Kraus, Patrick; Stokes, Peter; Cooper, Sir Cary; Liu, Yipeng; Moore, Neil; Britzelmaier, Bernd; Tarba, Shlomo (Informa UK Limited, 2020-01-20)
  • Displacement in Casamance, Senegal: Lessons (Hopefully) Learned, 2000–2019

    Evans, Martin; Coventry University
    The paper reflects on fieldwork conducted since 2000 with displaced communities in Lower and Middle Casamance, Senegal, amid arguably West Africa’s longest-running civil conflict. While this is a small conflict in a geographically confined space, Casamance presents a microcosm of dynamics common to other displacement situations in Africa. In this context the paper explores how the understandings, lived experiences and practices of the displaced transcend normative categories used by aid actors to define and manage such situations. Five thematic areas are examined: enumeration of the displaced; complex mobilities, both rural-urban and transnational; historiographic understandings of displacement; political manipulation of displacement situations; and the dynamics of return and reconstruction. The paper concludes by summarising failures of understanding in these areas among much of the aid community, and their consequences. It argues that well-grounded and socially nuanced understandings of displacement may inform more effective aid interventions and enhance the peace process.
  • Population Health Screening after Environmental Pollution

    Stewart, Alex G.; orcid: 0000-0002-4931-5340; email: dragonsteeth@doctors.org.uk; Wilkinson, Ewan; orcid: 0000-0002-2167-8756; email: ewilkinson@chester.ac.uk (MDPI, 2020-11-24)
    Following environmental pollution exposure, calls to screen the population for disease or disease markers are often made. Population screening is a cross-sectional review of a population to find latent cases or biomarkers of disease that indicate the possibility of disease development; it differs from environmental screening or an epidemiological survey. Recognized standard approaches have been developed over 60 years to ensure quality and effectiveness in complex programs. We surveyed the literature for papers on health screening following environmental exposures and checked them for reference to accepted criteria such as those of Wilson and Jungner. We applied these criteria to three situations covering source/hazard (arsenic contaminated land), pathway/exposure (radiation release), and receptor/disease (lead poisoning). We identified 36 relevant papers. Although across the papers the whole range of criteria were addressed, no paper or program utilized recognized criteria. Issues and gaps identified included limited strategic approaches, lack of treatment, environmental prevention being seen as the screening outcome instead of treatment of identified individuals, and programs which did not fit the World Health Organization screening description. Robust discussion in the literature is needed to consider the organization and role of health screening following environmental exposures.
  • Electrochemically detecting DNA methylation in the EN1 gene promoter: implications for understanding ageing and disease

    Morgan, Amy E.; Acutt, Katie D.; Mc Auley, Mark T.; orcid: 0000-0001-9230-6928 (Portland Press Ltd., 2020-11-17)
    Abstract There is a growing need for biomarkers which predict age-onset pathology. Although this is challenging, the methylome offers significant potential. Cancer is associated with the hypermethylation of many gene promoters, among which are developmental genes. Evolutionary theory suggests developmental genes arbitrate early-late life trade-offs, causing epimutations that increase disease vulnerability. Such genes could predict age-related disease. The aim of this work was to optimise an electrochemical procedure for the future investigation of a broad range of ageing-related pathologies. An electrochemical approach, which adopted three analytical techniques, was used to investigate DNA methylation in the engrailed-1 (EN1) gene promoter. Using synthetic single-stranded DNA, one technique was able to detect DNA at concentrations as low as 10 nM, with methylation status distinguishable at concentrations >25 nM. A negative correlation could be observed between % methylation of a heterogeneous solution and the key electrochemical parameter, charge transfer resistance (Rct; r = −0.982, P<0.01). The technique was applied to the breast cancer cell line Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7), where a similar correlation was observed (r = −0.965, P<0.01). These results suggest electrochemistry can effectively measure DNA methylation at low concentrations of DNA. This has implications for the future detection of age-related disease.
  • The role of antibody expression and their association with bladder cancer recurrence: a single-centre prospective clinical-pilot study in 35 patients

    Ella-tongwiis, Peter; Lamb, Rebecca May; Makanga, Alexander; Shergill, Iqbal; Hughes, Stephen Fôn; orcid: 0000-0001-6558-9037; email: Stephen.hughes6@wales.nhs.uk (BioMed Central, 2020-11-25)
    Abstract: Background: Bladder cancer (BC) is the 10th most common cancer in the UK, with about 10,000 new cases annually. About 75–85% of BC are non-muscle invasive (NMIBC), which is associated with high recurrence and progression rates (50–60% within 7–10 years). There are no routine biomarkers currently available for identifying BC patients at increased risk of developing recurrence. The focus of this research study was to evaluate antibody expression in BC patients and their association with cancer recurrence. Methods: 35 patients scheduled for TURBT were recruited after written informed consent. Ethical approval for the project was granted via IRAS (REC4: 14/WA/0033). Following surgical procedure, tissues were preserved in 10% buffered formalin and processed within 24 h in FFPE blocks. 7 sections (4 µm each) were cut from each block and stained for CD31, Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2), S100P, Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), VEGFR-3 thrombomodulin and CEACAM-1 using immunohistochemistry. Clinical outcome measures (obtained via cystoscopy) were monitored for up to 6 months following surgical procedure. Results: There was significantly increased expression of CD31 (p < 0.001), HER-2 (p = 0.032), S100P (p < 0.001), COX-2 (p < 0.001), VEGFR-3 (p < 0.001) and decreased expression of thrombomodulin (p = 0.010) and CEACAM-1 (p < 0.001) in bladder tumours compared to normal bladder tissues. HER-2 expression was also significantly associated with cancer grade (p = 0.003), especially between grade 1 and grade 2 (p = 0.002) and between grade 1 and grade 3 (p = 0.004). There was also a significant association between cancer stage and HER-2 expression (p < 0.001). Although recurrence was significantly associated with cancer grade, there was no association with antibody expression. Conclusion: Findings from the present study may indicate an alternative approach in the monitoring and management of patients with BC. It is proposed that by allowing urological surgeons access to laboratory markers such as HER-2, Thrombomodulin and CD31 (biomarker profile), potentially, in the future, these biomarkers may be used in addition to, or in combination with, currently used scoring systems to predict cancer recurrence. However, verification and validation of these biomarkers are needed using larger cohorts.

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