Now showing items 1-20 of 7729

    • A modified grounded theory study exploring the impact of military service in Northern Ireland on mental wellbeing

      Kingston, Paul; Taylor, Lou; Finnegan, Alan; Frith, Anthony (University of Chester, 2021-11)
      Military service in Operation Banner during the Northern Ireland Troubles posed significant challenges for individual soldiers. The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of service in Operation Banner on the mental wellbeing of veterans who served in this conflict, and factors that have hindered or facilitated acquiring help in those who have experienced mental distress. This is a qualitative study that has utilised a modified grounded theory methodology and adopted a symbolic interactionism theoretical framework. Data were collected in semi-structured interviews with 16 veterans, recruited via advertising in newsletters distributed by veterans’ organisations to their members, advertising via posters and local radio and through snowballing. Data analysis was by open and focussed coding, supported by computer assisted qualitative data analysis software. The study confirms that for the majority, military service did not result in long-term mental distress and participants gained useful career and life skills. Yet, for some mental distress has persisted. Since leaving Operation Banner, the ability of veterans to cope with the past and meet present or future challenges has been through a combination of innate skills, resilience, individual initiative, outside support, and making use of opportunity. For some, though, coping has been hindered by internal barriers such as self-isolation, emotional suppression, legacies of military culture and veterans’ perceptions of indifference or even hostility by society and politicians. These barriers have led to some veterans to being predominantly oriented towards the past and unable or unwilling to seek help, a situation made worse by threats of prosecuting veterans, which have reinforced memories of the past. This study theorises, therefore, that there is no single way to help these veterans without understanding each veteran’s perception of themselves. When this self-identity is predominantly past-oriented, internal barriers negate the relevance of external help. When the veteran’s self tends towards future-orientation, external barriers to accessing help are more relevant. Understanding this individuality of self-perception may help to address factors that are maintaining past-orientation. Yet, for those who seek a resilient future, providing the right services, at the right time and in the right format is critical. This study helps to fill the relative gap in qualitative studies on UK veterans and those from Operation Banner in particular. Recommendations are made for the support of Operation Banner veterans and for future research.
    • Recovery capital in the context of homelessness, high levels of alcohol consumption, and adverse significant life events

      Ross-Houle, Kim; Porcellato, Lorna; orcid: 0000-0002-8656-299X (Informa UK Limited, 2021-12-16)
    • ‘Every partnership [… is] an emotional experience’: towards a model of partnership support for addressing the emotional challenges of student–staff partnerships

      Healey, Ruth L.; orcid: 0000-0001-6872-4900; France, Derek; orcid: 0000-0001-6874-6800 (Informa UK Limited, 2022-01-10)
    • Interaction between Dietary Fat Intake and Metabolic Genetic Risk Score on 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentrations in a Turkish Adult Population

      Isgin-Atici, Kubra; orcid: 0000-0002-3088-8675; email: k.isginatici@gmail.com; Alathari, Buthaina E.; email: b.e.a.a.alathari@pgr.reading.ac.uk; Turan-Demirci, Busra; orcid: 0000-0001-5497-0887; email: busraturan@hacettepe.edu.tr; Sendur, Suleyman Nahit; email: snahitsendur@hotmail.com; Lay, Incilay; orcid: 0000-0002-1466-5746; email: lincilay@gmail.com; Ellahi, Basma; email: b.ellahi@chester.ac.uk; Alikasifoglu, Mehmet; email: kasif@hacettepe.edu.tr; Erbas, Tomris; orcid: 0000-0003-1377-9394; email: erbast@hacettepe.edu.tr; Buyuktuncer, Zehra; email: zbtuncer@hacettepe.edu.tr; Vimaleswaran, Karani Santhanakrishnan; orcid: 0000-0002-8485-8930; email: v.karani@reading.ac.uk (MDPI, 2022-01-17)
      Previous studies have pointed out a link between vitamin D status and metabolic traits, however, consistent evidence has not been provided yet. This cross-sectional study has used a nutrigenetic approach to investigate the interaction between metabolic-genetic risk score (GRS) and dietary intake on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations in 396 unrelated Turkish adults, aged 24−50 years. Serum 25(OH)D concentration was significantly lower in those with a metabolic-GRS ≥ 1 risk allele than those with a metabolic-GRS 1 risk allele (p = 0.020). A significant interaction between metabolic-GRS and dietary fat intake (energy%) on serum 25(OH)D levels was identified (Pinteraction = 0.040). Participants carrying a metabolic-GRS ≥ 1 risk allele and consuming a high fat diet (≥38% of energy = 122.3 ± 52.51 g/day) had significantly lower serum 25(OH)D concentration (p = 0.006) in comparison to those consuming a low-fat diet (38% of energy = 82.5 ± 37.36 g/d). In conclusion, our study suggests a novel interaction between metabolic-GRS and dietary fat intake on serum 25(OH)D level, which emphasises that following the current dietary fat intake recommendation (35% total fat) could be important in reducing the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in this Turkish population. Nevertheless, further larger studies are needed to verify this interaction, before implementing personalized dietary recommendations for the maintenance of optimal vitamin D status.
    • ‘‘Turning the Wheel of the Dharma’: A translation of Aśvaghoṣa’s Buddhacarita Canto 15 from a recently rediscovered Sanskrit manuscript

      Jones, Dhivan Thomas; University of Chester (Cardiff University Press, 2021-12-15)
      This article offers a first translation into English of the re-discovered Sanskrit text of Canto 15 of Aśvaghoṣa’s Buddhacarita. While Cantos 1–14 of Aśvaghoṣa’s kāvya, or long poem on the life of the Buddha, have survived in Sanskrit, it had been thought that Cantos 15–24 only survived in Tibetan and Chinese translations. But the Japanese scholar Kazunobu Matsuda, working with Jens-Üwe Hartmann, has recently identified the whole of Canto 15 embedded in a Sanskrit manuscript of the Tridaṇḍamālā, attributed to Aśvaghoṣa. While Matsuda has made a translation into Japanese, I offer a translation of the Sanskrit text of Buddhacarita Canto 15 into English. A distinctive feature of this translation is that I present a prose translation, conveying the Sanskrit syntax and vocabulary in an accurate form, alongside a verse translation, suggesting some of the poetic qualities of Ásvaghoṣa’s Sanskrit in the form of English blank verse and unrhymed ballad metre.
    • What Kinds of Meditation Are There in Buddhism?

      Jones, Dhivan Jones; University of Chester (Equinox Publishing, 2021-10-25)
      Answer to the question, What Kinds of Meditation Are There in Buddhism?
    • What Is non-attachment in Buddhism?

      Jones, Dhivan Thomas; University of Chester (Equinox Publishing, 2021-10-25)
      Answer to the question, What Is Non-Attachment in Buddhism?
    • What do we know about the historical Buddha?

      Jones, Dhivan Thomas; University of Chester (Equinox Publishing, 2021-10-25)
      Answer to the question, What do we know about the historical Buddha?
    • Are Buddhists Vegetarian?

      Jones, Dhivan Thomas; University of Chester (Equinox, 2021-10-25)
      Answer to the question, Are Buddhists vegetarian?
    • LevelEd SR: A Substitutional Reality Level Design Workflow

      Beever, Lee; John, Nigel W.; University of Chester
      Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) have continued to increase in popularity over the past decade. However, there are still issues with how much space is required for room-scale VR and experiences are still lacking from haptic feedback. We present LevelEd SR, a substitutional reality level design workflow that combines AR and VR systems and is built for consumer devices. The system enables passive haptics through the inclusion of physical objects from within a space into a virtual world. A validation study (17 participants) has produced quantitative data that suggests players benefit from passive haptics in entertainment VR games with an improved game experience and increased levels of presence. Including objects, such as real-world furniture that is paired with a digital proxy in the virtual world, also opens up more spaces to be used for room-scale VR. We evaluated the workflow and found that participants were accepting of the system, rating it positively using the System Usability Scale questionnaire and would want to use it again to experience substitutional reality.
    • ‘How you keep going’: Voluntary sector practitioners’ story-lines as emotion work

      Quinn, Kaitlyn; Tomczak, Philippa; Buck, Gillian; University of Toronto; University of Nottingham; University of Chester (Wiley, 2022-01-16)
      The voluntary sector acts as the last line of defense for some of the most marginalized people in societies around the world, yet its capacities are significantly reduced by chronic resource shortages and dynamic political obstacles. Existing research has scarcely examined what it is like for voluntary sector practitioners working amidst these conditions. In this paper, we explore how penal voluntary sector practitioners across England and Scotland marshaled their personal and professional resources to “keep going” amidst significant challenges. Our analysis combines symbolic interactionism with the concept of story- lines. We illuminate the narratives that practitioners mobilized to understand and motivate their efforts amidst the significant barriers, chronic limitations, and difficult emotions brought forth by their work. We position practitioners' story- lines as a form of emotion work that mitigated their experiences of anger, frustration, overwhelm, sadness, and disappointment, enabling them to move forward and continue to support criminalized individuals. Our analysis details three story- lines— resignation, strategy, and refuge—and examines their consequences for practitioners and their capacities to intervene in wicked social problems.
    • Use of vision-based augmented reality to improve student learning of the spine and spinal deformities. An exploratory study.

      Kandasamy, Gok; orcid: 0000-0002-2569-2205; Bettany-Saltikov, Josette; orcid: 0000-0001-7784-500X; Cordry, Julien; orcid: 0000-0002-6489-3026; McSherry, Rob; orcid: 0000-0003-1335-5014 (2021-10-29)
      <h4>Background</h4>Knowledge of anatomy and pathology of the spine together with spinal deformities is integral to several healthcare disciplines. This knowledge is crucial for graduates for assessment and management of patients with spinal problems. Physiotherapy students generally find it difficult to conceptualise the integrity of the structure and function of the spine that affects their acquisition of related physiotherapy skills.<h4>Objective</h4>Our first objective was to introduce and evaluate the use of a Vision-Based Augmented Reality (VBAR) mobile application to teach students the anatomy and accessory movements of the spine. A further objective was to explore student experiences of and engagement with VBAR by conducting a post-lecture survey comparing VBAR to traditional teaching.<h4>Methods</h4>This post-intervention crossover design study included two groups: final year physiotherapy students (<i>n</i> = 74) and mean age of 23 (±1.8). The computing department at Teesside University developed the VBAR mobile application. Moreover, a survey adapted from a previously published article was disseminated to students to evaluate their level of understanding following the use of the VBAR application.<h4>Results</h4>The results demonstrated that the median questionnaire scores in students' perceived level of understanding for the VBAR group were significantly higher than for the traditional teaching group (<i>p</i> < 0.05).<h4>Conclusion</h4>The results of this post-intervention survey suggest that the integration of VBAR learning activities results in gains relating to students' understanding of spinal anatomy, function, pathology and deformities. These findings suggest that VBAR could be an additional teaching tool to support student learning.<h4>Clinical implications</h4>Greater understanding is expected to increase the quality of clinical practice.
    • Regucalcin ameliorates doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in Cos-7 kidney cells and translocates from the nucleus to the mitochondria

      Mohammed, Noor A.; Hakeem, Israa J.; Hodges, Nikolas; Michelangeli, Francesco; orcid: 0000-0002-4878-046X (Portland Press Ltd., 2022-01-06)
      Abstract Doxorubicin (DOX) is a potent anticancer drug, which can have unwanted side-effects such as cardiac and kidney toxicity. A detailed investigation was undertaken of the acute cytotoxic mechanisms of DOX on kidney cells, using Cos-7 cells as kidney cell model. Cos-7 cells were exposed to DOX for a period of 24 h over a range of concentrations, and the LC50 was determined to be 7 µM. Further investigations showed that cell death was mainly via apoptosis involving Ca2+ and caspase 9, in addition to autophagy. Regucalcin (RGN), a cytoprotective protein found mainly in liver and kidney tissues, was overexpressed in Cos-7 cells and shown to protect against DOX-induced cell death. Subcellular localization studies in Cos-7 cells showed RGN to be strongly correlated with the nucleus. However, upon treatment with DOX for 4 h, which induced membrane blebbing in some cells, the localization appeared to be correlated more with the mitochondria in these cells. It is yet to be determined whether this translocation is part of the cytoprotective mechanism or a consequence of chemically induced cell stress.
    • Raising the bar in sports performance research

      Abt, Grant; orcid: 0000-0002-4079-9270; Jobson, Simon; orcid: 0000-0002-1377-2128; Morin, Jean-Benoit; orcid: 0000-0003-3808-6762; Passfield, Louis; orcid: 0000-0001-6223-162X; Sampaio, Jaime; orcid: 0000-0003-2335-9991; Sunderland, Caroline; orcid: 0000-0001-7484-1345; Twist, Craig; orcid: 0000-0001-6168-0378 (Informa UK Limited, 2022-01-06)
    • Weight loss practices and eating behaviours among female physique athletes: Acquiring the optimal body composition for competition

      editor: McLester, Cherilyn N.; Alwan, Nura; orcid: 0000-0002-7033-6250; email: N.alwan@2016.ljmu.ac.uk; Moss, Samantha L.; Davies, Ian G.; orcid: 0000-0003-3722-8466; Elliott-Sale, Kirsty J.; Enright, Kevin (Public Library of Science, 2022-01-14)
      Little is known about weight loss practices and eating behaviours in female physique athletes. This study investigated the weight loss history, practices, and key influences during the pre-competition period in a large cohort of female physique athletes stratified by division and experience level. Eating attitudes and behaviours were assessed to identify whether athletes were at risk of developing an eating disorder. Using a cross-sectional research design, female physique athletes (n = 158) were recruited and completed an anonymous online self-reported survey consisting of two validated questionnaires: Rapid Weight Loss Questionnaire and Eating Attitudes Test-26. Irrespective of division or experience, female physique athletes used a combination of weight loss practices during the pre-competition phase. Gradual dieting (94%), food restriction (64%) and excessive exercise (84%), followed by body water manipulation via water loading (73%) were the most commonly used methods. Overall, 37% of female physique athletes were considered at risk of developing an eating disorder. Additionally, 42% of female physique athletes used two pathogenic weight control methods with 34% of Figure novice athletes indicating binge eating once a week or more. The coach (89%) and another athlete (73%) were identified as key influences on athletes’ dieting practices and weight loss. The prevalence of athletes identified with disordered eating symptoms and engaging in pathogenic weight control methods is concerning. In future, female physique athletes should seek advice from registered nutritionists to optimise weight management practices and minimise the risk of developing an eating disorder.
    • Peggy the Tutor, Mentor, Colleague and Friend.

      Dossett, Wendy; Burns, Andrew; Schmidt, Bettina; University of Chester; Alister Hardy Society; Religious Experience Research Centre, University of Wales Trinity St David (Religious Experience Research Centre, 2021-08-03)
      Introduction to the Festschrift - Essays in Honour of Peggy Morgan
    • Editorial: Geoscience communication - Planning to make it publishable

      Hillier, John; Welsh, Katharine; Stiller-Reever, Mathew; Priestley, Rebecca; Roop, Heidi; Lanza, Tiziana; Illingworth, Sam; Loughborough University; University of Chester; Konsulent Stiller-Reeve & University of Bergen; Victoria University of Wellington; University of Minnesota; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia; Edinburgh Napier University (Copernicus Publications, 2021-10-27)
      If you are a geoscientist doing work to achieve impact outside academia or engaging different audiences with the geosciences, are you planning to make this publishable? If so, then plan. Such investigations into how people (academics, practitioners, other publics) respond to geoscience can use pragmatic, simple research methodologies accessible to the non-specialist or be more complex. To employ a medical analogy, first aid is useful and the best option in some scenarios, but calling a medic (i.e. a collaborator with experience of geoscience communication or relevant research methods) provides the contextual knowledge to identify a condition and opens up a diverse, more powerful range of treatment options. Here, we expand upon the brief advice in the first editorial of Geoscience Communication (Illingworth et al., 2018), illustrating what constitutes robust and publishable work in this context, elucidating its key elements. Our aim is to help geoscience communicators plan a route to publication and to illustrate how good engagement work that is already being done might be developed into publishable research.
    • Lower pollen nutritional quality delays nest building and egg laying in Bombus terrestris audax micro-colonies leading to reduced biomass gain

      Ryder, Jordan T.; Cherrill, Andrew; Thompson, Helen M.; Walters, Keith F. A.; orcid: 0000-0002-5262-3125; email: kwalters@ic.ac.uk (Springer Paris, 2021-09-27)
      Abstract: The performance of Bombus terrestris micro-colonies fed five diets differing in pollen species composition and level of nine essential amino acids (EAA; leucine, lysine, valine, arginine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, threonine, histidine, methionine) was assessed for 37 days by recording total biomass gain, nest building initiation, brood production (eggs, small and large larvae, pupae, drones), nectar, and pollen collection. Stronger colony performance was linked to higher amino acid levels but no consistent differences in biomass gain were recorded between mono- and poly-species diets. Poorest performance occurred in micro-colonies offered pure oilseed rape (OSR) pollen which contained the lowest EAA levels. Reduced micro-colony development (delayed nest initiation and lower brood production) was related to OSR proportion in the diet and lower EAA levels. Results are discussed in relation to selection of plant species in the design of habitats to promote bee populations.
    • La mémoire des conflits dans la fiction française contemporaine

      OBERGÖKER, Timo (Informa UK Limited, 2022-01-04)
    • Mission Team Life Transformative discipleship and leadership development in context

      Knowles, Steve; Graham, Elaine; Silk, Ian G. (University of Chester, 2021-06)
      Mission team life - the lived experience of missioning together that is given shape and meaning through relationships, practices, processes and values - is a social reality and modus operandi whose transformational potential has been largely unrecognised. The way discipleship is currently being reimagined for churches is impoverished by this lack of recognition. This study investigates the shape of mission team life in lived experience and its impact on those who participate in it. Using qualitative research methods including semi-structured interviewing, thematic analysis, theological reflection and poetic reframing I draw on the life-stories of thirteen mission leaders in a variety of local contexts to explore both the constituent elements and the overall character of mission team life. As a reflective practitioner and facilitator of mission teams I bring my own experience to the interpretation of their narratives. I demonstrate that mission team life comprises six interweaving relational dynamics: synergia (co-working), koinonia (the sharing of lives), diakonia (serving), pneumatika (spiritual practices), mathemata (lessons learned) and euremata (attending to surprise discoveries). The character of the whole is relational, complex, chaordic, adventuresome and Spirit-filled. Such life together is a way of discipleship in which vocations are mutually discerned and leadership emerges in context. An understanding of the dynamics and character of mission team life can equip the Church’s theological imagination in vital areas. This research addresses debilitating dichotomies highlighted or implied in recent official reports through a robust conceptualisation of discipleship and an account of practice based in lived experience. Reflective practitioners whose values in ministry are formed through mission team living demonstrate an understanding of collaboration, compassion, hospitality, spirituality, co-empowerment and prophetic imagination. When these qualities also become the hallmark of the mission teams they lead the result can be a way of discipleship that is both imaginative and transformative. My conceptualisation of the relational dynamics of mission team life is thus a fresh paradigm, offering to churches, missions and the academy a way of seeing, understanding and living a transformative discipleship rich in spirituality, synergy, community, ministries and leadership potential.